Saleae USB Devices Driver Download For Windows

USB
  1. Saleae Usb Devices Driver Download For Windows 8
  2. Saleae Usb Devices Driver Download For Windows 7
  3. Saleae Usb Devices Driver Download For Windows 10

Saleae Usb Devices Driver Download For Windows 8

USB Composite Device Drivers Download. HardwareIDs: USB VID0925&PID3881&REV0001. Windows 7,Windows 8,Windows XP,Windows Vista,Windows Server 2008. I followed the KB Drivers for EZ-USB® FX1™, FX2LP™, and FX3™ - KBA94413 to download Drivers.zip. When I update driver through browse my unzip driver, Windows prompted 'Couldnot find the driver for your device' My device is a simple logic analysis 24MHz with CY7C68013A chip.

  • Download Linux, Raspberry Pi, macOS and Windows packages from the Releases page. (The RPi, macOS and Windows packages are not tested, neither is the installation of the.rpm packages. For RPi4 see also issue #28.) If you want to follow ongoing development, packages built from the last commit are available in the unstable release.
  • If you are installing USB drivers: You do not need to download USB device class drivers. They are installed automatically. These drivers and their installation files are included in Windows. They are available in the Windows System32 DriverStore FileRepository folder.
  • Here you will find the latest Tecno USB Drivers. Download and install the latest Tecno USB Drivers on your PC before performing any task connecting your phone to PC. The improvements in technology has changed the way people do certain things in their daily life. The smartphone can be considered as the.

I bought a cheap ($18 shipped) logic analyser from China (via AliExpress) which recently arrived in the post. It’s a clone of the $150 Saleae Logic Analyser. Here it is:

Saleae USB Devices Driver Download For Windows

And here are its insides:

A rather grubby looking board. I also noticed a couple of small solder balls which could have been shorting out a couple of the pins of the main IC, the Cypress CY7C68013A, so I removed them. Having done some research on the Saleae Logic, the components didn’t come as much surprise. The CY7C68013A is an 8051 microprocessor with a USB transceiver bolted on. Logic states are read via an 8 bit wide IO port and sent back over USB to the software. The maximum claimed sample rate is 24Mhz.

The only difference to the Saleae Logic is the addition of an HC245, an ‘Octal 3-State Noninverting Bus Transceiver’, on the back of the board. This was probably added to try and protect the inputs of the CY7C68013A from overvoltage, but it’s ability to do so is questionable. Still, for all intents and purposes, this clone should function exactly the same as a real Saleae Logic.

Note the 2Kb (256 byte) EEPROM on the bottom right of the final photo. This contains configuration data for the CY7C68013A, in particular the VID/PID combination. The VID is a 16-bit vendor number (Vendor ID) and the PID is a 16-bit product number (Product ID). This allows the product to be identified as a ‘Saleae USB Logic Analyzer’, instead of a generic CY7C68013A device. Also, note that the EEPROM contains no firmware – the firmware is loaded over USB on startup of the logic analyser software. This make the board itself very generic – the only thing that separates this device from many others on the market is the 4 byte VID/PID! More on this later…

I installed the Saleae Logic software, plugged in the clone and it was recognised instantly. It seemed to work! Next, I decided to test its accuracy. I programmed a PIC to output a periodic signal as fast as possible (the chip was clocked at 8MHz):

I measured the output with the logic analyser first – it showed a high time of 500ns and a low time of 1500 nanoseconds. Next I measured the signal with an oscilloscope and measured it to be exactly the same (to my eye!). So, the accuracy certainly seems reasonable up to at least 500kHz. (I should have tested at a higher speed, but didn’t have anything faster to hand).

Windows

Another product on the market, the USBee, uses exactly the same hardware. I was aware of other clones which allowed you to select, via jumper, impersonating either a Saleae or USBee, so I wanted to see if I could do this myself.

The procedure boils down to modifying the VID/PID contained in the EEPROM mentioned earlier. The software, e.g. Saleae Logic looks for the right VID/PID of the hardware. If it finds the right VID/PID, it uploads the firmware and starts working. The same can be said for the USBee software, albeit with a different VID/PID. Now, the obvious way to change the VID/PID contained in the EEPROM in order to fake a USBee is to desolder the EEPROM, reprogram it and solder it back, but there’s a better way.

Some googling quickly led to this article, explaining how to read the EEPROM contents using the CY7C68013A (which the EEPROM is of course connected to). So, I downloaded the Cypress EZ-USB development kit (cy3684_ez_usb_fx2lp_development_kit_15.exe) which contained the tools to allow this.

Here’s my step by step guide for doing it with Win7 x64 (note that steps 2 and 5 can be ignored on Win XP. Infact, if you have an XP box available, it’s easier to do it on that).

  1. Uninstall the Saleae Logic Driver, using Device Manager.
  2. We want to install the generic cyusb.sys Cypress driver which will allow us to send commands to the device using CyConsole. If you’re using Win XP, goto step 3. Else, download Cypress Suite USB (CySuiteUSB_3_4_7_B204.exe) which contains the Win7 x64 driver.
  3. Locate the appropriate cyusb driver. For Win 7 x64, this is: C:CypressCypress Suite USB 3.4.7Driverbinwlhx64. For Win XP, we can use the older version of the driver, found in the Dev Kit package, here: C:CypressUSBDriversCyUsb.
  4. Open cyusb.inf. This must be modified to contain the VID/PID of our clone (which is also the VID/PID of the Saleae Logic), so that Windows will accept and install the driver CyUSB. So, replace all instances of USBVID_XXXX&PID_XXXX with USBVID_0925&PID_3881 (note that the VID/PID of the device can be found in device manager). Also, make sure to uncomment (remove the semi-colon) the lines looking like this: “%VID_0925&PID_3881.DeviceDesc%=CyUsb, USBVID_0925&PID_3881″.
  5. If you’re Running Windows 7 (and also Vista, I think), you’ll need to force Windows to accept installing unsigned kernel drivers. To do so, restart your computer and press F8 during the boot process, as you do to start in safe-mode. However, instead of selecting safe-mode from the boot menu, select ‘Disable Driver Signature Enforcement’. Note that this is temporary – the driver won’t remained installed after a reboot. This is fine for our purposes.
  6. Install the CyUSB driver.
  7. Start CyConsole.
  8. Select ‘EZ-USB Interface’ from the Options menu.
  9. Press the ‘Download’ button. This allows us to upload our own firmware.
  10. Select the file C:CypressUSBExamplesFX2LPVend_axVend_Ax.hex. You should see the firmware being uploaded and the 8051 will be reset.
  11. Let’s first read our current EEPROM contents:
    • Enter ’0xA2′ into the ‘Req’ box next to the ‘Vend Req’ button.
    • Set ‘Length’ to 8
    • Make sure ‘Dir’ is set to ’1 IN’
    • Now click ‘Vend Req’. You should see 8 bytes of Hex codes starting with ‘C0′. My device read out: ‘C0 25 09 81 38 1B 00 00′. Note the VID (09 25) and PID (38 81) are stored in little-endian format. C0 is required by the Cypress chip. I am unsure what 1B is for.
  12. Now let’s program the VID/PID of the USBee ZX into our EEPROM:
    • Enter the bytes ’C0 A9 08 05 00 84 23 00′ into the ‘Hex Bytes’ field.
    • Now change the ‘Dir’ box to ’0 OUT’
    • Click ‘Vend Req’. The bytes written will be echoed back to the console.
  13. That’s it! Make sure your have the USBee Suite installed along with the ZX test pod. Pull out the device, plug it back in and it should be recognised by USBee as the ZX model.

So, while not as easy as switching a few jumpers, the device can be made to look like a USBee ZX without too much effort. I believe that the USBee driver is just a signed version of the CyUSB driver, which means that the device is recognised by CyConsole (as opposed to the Saleae driver, which seems to be modified such that the device doesn’t show up in CyConsole, hence the rigmarole of installing CyUSB above). This means that changing back to Saleae Logic is as simple as following steps 7 to 12, but programming with our original bytes ‘C0 25 09 81 38 1B 00 00′.

If you’re constantly switching between firmwares, a better idea may be to remove the EEPROM and solder an 8 DIP socket in it’s place. By cutting a hole in the back of the case, the EEPROM could then easily be changed.

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Important

Saleae USB devices Driver Download for windows

This topic is for programmers. If you are a customer experiencing USB problems, see Troubleshoot common USB problems

This topic lists the Microsoft-provided drivers for the supported USB device classes.

  • Microsoft-provided drivers for USB-IF approved device classes.
  • For composite devices, use USB Generic Parent Driver (Usbccgp.sys) that creates physical device objects (PDOs) for each function.
  • For non-composite devices or a function of a composite device, use WinUSB (Winusb.sys).

If you are installing USB drivers: You do not need to download USB device class drivers. They are installed automatically. These drivers and their installation files are included in Windows. They are available in the WindowsSystem32DriverStoreFileRepository folder. The drivers are updated through Windows Update.

If you are writing a custom driver: Before writing a driver for your USB device, determine whether a Microsoft-provided driver meets the device requirements. If a Microsoft-provided driver is not available for the USB device class to which your device belongs, then consider using generic drivers, Winusb.sys or Usbccgp.sys. Write a driver only when necessary. More guidelines are included in Choosing a driver model for developing a USB client driver.

USB Device classes

USB Device classes are categories of devices with similar characteristics and that perform common functions. Those classes and their specifications are defined by the USB-IF. Each device class is identified by USB-IF approved class, subclass, and protocol codes, all of which are provided by the IHV in device descriptors in the firmware. Microsoft provides in-box drivers for several of those device classes, called USB device class drivers. If a device that belongs to a supported device class is connected to a system, Windows automatically loads the class driver, and the device functions with no additional driver required.

Hardware vendors should not write drivers for the supported device classes. Windows class drivers might not support all of the features that are described in a class specification. If some of the device's capabilities are not implemented by the class driver, vendors should provide supplementary drivers that work in conjunction with the class driver to support the entire range of functionality provided by the device.

For general information about USB-IF approved device classes see the USB Common Class Specification

The current list of USB class specifications and class codes is documented in the USB-IF Defined Class Code List.

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Device setup classes

Windows categorizes devices by device setup classes, which indicate the functionality of the device.

Microsoft defines setup classes for most devices. IHVs and OEMs can define new device setup classes, but only if none of the existing classes apply. For more information, see System-Defined Device Setup Classes.

Two important device setup classes for USB devices are as follows:

  • USBDevice {88BAE032-5A81-49f0-BC3D-A4FF138216D6}: IHVs must use this class for custom devices that do not belong to another class. This class is not used for USB host controllers and hubs.

  • USB {36fc9e60-c465-11cf-8056-444553540000}: IHVs must not use this class for their custom devices. This is reserved for USB host controllers and USB hubs.

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The device setup classes are different from USB device classes discussed earlier. For example, an audio device has a USB device class code of 01h in its descriptor. When connected to a system, Windows loads the Microsoft-provided class driver, Usbaudio.sys. In Device Manager, the device is shown under is Sound, video and game controllers, which indicates that the device setup class is Media.

Microsoft-provided USB device class drivers

USB-IF class codeDevice setup classMicrosoft-provided driver and INFWindows supportDescription
Audio (01h)Media
{4d36e96c-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
Usbaudio.sys

Wdma_usb.inf

Windows 10 for desktop editions (Home, Pro, Enterprise, and Education)
Windows 10 Mobile
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides support for the USB audio device class by means of the Usbaudio.sys driver. For more information, see 'USBAudio Class System Driver' in Kernel-Mode WDM Audio Components. For more information about Windows audio support, see the Audio Device Technologies for Windows website.
Communications and CDC Control (02h)
Ports
{4D36E978-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}
Usbser.sys
Usbser.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 10 Mobile
In Windows 10, a new INF, Usbser.inf, has been added that loads Usbser.sys automatically as the function driver.

For more information, see USB serial driver (Usbser.sys)

Modem
{4D36E96D-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}

Note Supports Subclass 02h (ACM)

Usbser.sys
Custom INF that references mdmcpq.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
In Windows 8.1 and earlier versions, Usbser.sys is not automatically loaded. To load the driver, you need to write an INF that references the modem INF (mdmcpq.inf) and includes [Install] and [Needs] sections.

Starting with Windows Vista, you can enable CDC and Wireless Mobile CDC (WMCDC) support by setting a registry value, as described in Support for the Wireless Mobile Communication Device Class.

When CDC support is enabled, the USB Common Class Generic Parent Driver enumerates interface collections that correspond to CDC and WMCDC Control Models, and assigns physical device objects (PDO) to these collections.

Net
{4d36e972-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
Note Supports Subclass 0Eh (MBIM)
wmbclass.sys
Netwmbclass.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Starting in Windows 8, Microsoft provides the wmbclass.sys driver, for mobile broadband devices. See, MB Interface Model.
HID (Human Interface Device) (03h)HIDClass
{745a17a0-74d3-11d0-b6fe-00a0c90f57da}
Hidclass.sys
Hidusb.sys
Input.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 10 Mobile
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides the HID class driver (Hidclass.sys) and the miniclass driver (Hidusb.sys) to operate devices that comply with the USB HID Standard. For more information, see HID Architecture and Minidrivers and the HID class driver. For further information about Windows support for input hardware, see the Input and HID - Architecture and Driver Support website.
Physical (05h)---Recommended driver: WinUSB (Winusb.sys)
Image (06h)Image
{6bdd1fc6-810f-11d0-bec7-08002be2092f}
Usbscan.sys
Sti.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides the Usbscan.sys driver that manages USB digital cameras and scanners for Windows XP and later operating systems. This driver implements the USB component of the Windows Imaging Architecture (WIA). For more information about WIA, see Windows Image Acquisition Drivers and the Windows Imaging Component website. For a description of the role that Usbscan.sys plays in the WIA, see WIA Core Components.
Printer (07h)USB

Note Usbprint.sys enumerates printer devices under the device set up class: Printer

{4d36e979-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}.

Usbprint.sys
Usbprint.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides the Usbprint.sys class driver that manages USB printers. For information about implementation of the printer class in Windows, see the Printing - Architecture and Driver Support website.
Mass Storage (08h)
USBUsbstor.sysWindows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 10 Mobile
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides the Usbstor.sys port driver to manage USB mass storage devices with Microsoft's native storage class drivers. For an example device stack that is managed by this driver, see Device Object Example for a USB Mass Storage Device. For information about Windows storage support, see the Storage Technologies website.
SCSIAdapter

{4d36e97b-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}

SubClass (06) and Protocol (62)
Uaspstor.sys
Uaspstor.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 10 Mobile
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Uaspstor.sys is the class driver for SuperSpeed USB devices that support bulk stream endpoints. For more information see:
Hub (09h)USB

{36fc9e60-c465-11cf-8056-444553540000}

Usbhub.sys
Usb.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 10 Mobile
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides the Usbhub.sys driver for managing USB hubs. For more information about the relationship between the hub class driver and the USB stack, see USB host-side drivers in Windows.
Usbhub3.sys
Usbhub3.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Microsoft provides the Usbhub3.sys driver for managing SuperSpeed (USB 3.0) USB hubs.

The driver is loaded when a SuperSpeed hub is attached to an xHCI controller. See USB host-side drivers in Windows.

CDC-Data (0Ah)---Recommended driver: WinUSB (Winusb.sys)
Smart Card (0Bh)SmartCardReader

{50dd5230-ba8a-11d1-bf5d-0000f805f530}

Usbccid.sys (Obsolete)Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 7
Windows Server 2008
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides the Usbccid.sys mini-class driver to manage USB smart card readers. For more information about smart card drivers in Windows, see Smart Card Design Guide.

Note that for Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, and Windows 2000, special instructions are required for loading this driver because it might have been released later than the operating system.

Note Usbccid.sys driver has been replaced by UMDF driver, WUDFUsbccidDriver.dll.

WUDFUsbccidDriver.dll
WUDFUsbccidDriver.inf
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
WUDFUsbccidDriver.dll is a user-mode driver for USB CCID Smart Card Reader devices.
Content Security (0Dh)---Recommended driver: USB Generic Parent Driver (Usbccgp.sys). Some content security functionality is implemented in Usbccgp.sys. See Content Security Features in Usbccgp.sys.
Video (0Eh)Image
{6bdd1fc6-810f-11d0-bec7-08002be2092f}
Usbvideo.sys

Usbvideo.inf

Windows 10 for desktop editions

Windows Vista

Microsoft provides USB video class support by means of the Usbvideo.sys driver. For more information, see 'USB Video Class Driver' under AVStream Minidrivers.

Note that for Windows XP, special instructions are required for loading this driver because it might have been released later than the operating system.

Personal Healthcare (0Fh)---Recommended driver: WinUSB (Winusb.sys)
Audio/Video Devices (10h)----
Diagnostic Device (DCh)---Recommended driver: WinUSB (Winusb.sys)
Wireless Controller (E0h)

Note Supports Subclass 01h and Protocol 01h

Bluetooth

{e0cbf06c-cd8b-4647-bb8a-263b43f0f974}

Bthusb.sys

Bth.inf

Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 10 Mobile
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Vista
Microsoft provides the Bthusb.sys miniport driver to manage USB Bluetooth radios. For more information, see Bluetooth Design Guide.
Miscellaneous (EFh)Net

{4d36e972-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}

Note Supports SubClass 04h and Protocol 01h

Rndismp.sys
Rndismp.inf
Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 8.1
Windows 8
Windows 7
Windows Vista
Prior to Windows Vista, support for CDC is limited to the RNDIS-specific implementation of the Abstract Control Model (ACM) with a vendor-unique protocol (bInterfaceProtocol) value of 0xFF. The RNDIS facility centers the management of all 802-style network cards in a single class driver, Rndismp.sys. For a detailed discussion of remote NDIS, see Overview of Remote NDIS. The mapping of remote NDIS to USB is implemented in the Usb8023.sys driver. For further information about networking support in Windows, see the Networking and Wireless Technologies website.
Application Specific (FEh)---Recommended driver: WinUSB (Winusb.sys)
Vendor Specific (FFh)--Windows 10 for desktop editions
Windows 10 Mobile
Recommended driver: WinUSB (Winusb.sys)

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